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JuneYoung Lim’s Injects ‘Like Water’ into Cityscapes

“Like Water” is a series from photographer JuneYoung Lim, who brings kinetic, liquid forms into cityscapes. The artist says that she considers there to be two elements to a city: the towering structures and the “ever-fluid” citizens that occupy it. The goal of this project is to "combine to create an air of vitality to the otherwise acid city."

“Like Water” is a series from photographer JuneYoung Lim, who brings kinetic, liquid forms into cityscapes. The artist says that she considers there to be two elements to a city: the towering structures and the “ever-fluid” citizens that occupy it. The goal of this project is to “combine to create an air of vitality to the otherwise acid city.”




As far as the process for each of the works: First, the artist photographs the water in the studio, using strobe lighting techniques and a black-cloth backdrop. Lim then injects these forms into photographs of the city using Photoshop. It seems that for the most part, the liquid has taken our place as citizens and movers and shakers in each scene.




The artist also aims to combine two types of material: organic and the man-made, geometric forms. The artist says that the idea of the yin and the yang is one of the foundations for this project. At times, the water seems to move with the static structures, yet in another pieces, it seems to defy it.

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