Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Urs Fischer Rearranges Faces into Topographical Forms

Swiss artist Urs Fischer, based in New York, adapts the human face into topographical forms in his paintings. Works like "Landscape," above, are crafted from aluminum panel, reinforced polyurethane foam, epoxy, acrylic ink, primer, paint, and silkscreen, and gesso. These paintings reorganize visages into landscapes, with the artist's own face used in differing ways. The recent show “Mind Moves,” erected at Gagosian Gallery in San Francisco, was accompanied by a quote from the artist: “At its core, art is all about order. When you're an artist, you basically arrange, rearrange, or alter; you play off order.”


Swiss artist Urs Fischer, based in New York, adapts the human face into topographical forms in his paintings. Works like “Landscape,” above, are crafted from aluminum panel, reinforced polyurethane foam, epoxy, acrylic ink, primer, paint, and silkscreen, and gesso. These paintings reorganize visages into landscapes, with the artist’s own face used in differing ways. The recent show “Mind Moves,” erected at Gagosian Gallery in San Francisco, was accompanied by a quote from the artist: “At its core, art is all about order. When you’re an artist, you basically arrange, rearrange, or alter; you play off order.”




Fischer is a Zurich native, and he’s had solo exhibitions across the world, including Institute of Contemporary Arts in London, Stedelijk Museum Bureau in Amsterdam, and Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris.





As the gallery described the body of work “Mind Moves” in the fall: “Fischer’s own lips, nose, and eyebrows are freed from self-portraiture, instead becoming shapes that slide and mutate, melting and hardening in bright hues. With this series, Fischer recalls the compositional structures of grand landscape painting, presenting the two halves of his own face as topographical masses, propping gently against one another.”



Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
Artist and animation director Joe Vaux paints what he likes. His personal work is teeming with impish demons. His cheerful hellscapes are populated with lost souls, sharp toothed monstrosities, and swarms of wrong-doers. And yet, there’s an innocence to all of this. Click to read the Hi-Fructose exclusive interview with Joe Vaux.

Fumi Nakamura

With only the uniform confines of 12 inches x 12 inches in size, nearly 90 artists contribute to the latest edition of the group effort "LAX / SFO.” The third iteration of the Thinkspace Projects-curated program begins at Heron Arts in San Francisco on Saturday. Among the contributing artists are Alex Garant, Anthony Hurd, Baldur Helgason, Casey Weldon, Fumi Nakamura, Jeremy Fish, Jolene Lai, Logan Hicks, Pichi Avo, Wiley Wallace, Yok & Sheryo, and many, many more.
Anna Weyant’s stirring paintings offer both autobiographical imagery and universal examinations of life’s stages. Recent shows, like "Welcome to the Dollhouse" at 56 HENRY, are contemplative and elegant in execution. That show, in particular, was a showcase of the artist’s cinematic sensibility.
Using silicone, wood, resin, actual hair, and marble, Mexican sculptor Ruben Orozco crafts realistic depictions of famous figures. Created in varying scales, these entrancing figures have gone viral for their eerie reflection of humanity. He's created sculptures depicting Frida Kahlo, Pope Francis, and other historical figures. The work may remind you of other sculptors of realistic figures, like Ron Mueck and Kazuhiro Tsuji.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List