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Mark Ollinger Dissects Communication in Optical Art

Mark Ollinger, a Calgary-born artist, explores communication with his mindbending studies on the elements of language. In both his sculptures and paintings, the architecture of letters and and interlocking forms engross in several perspectives. In several of the artist’s public works, these pieces are hidden in corners, crevices, and underneath structures, as puzzles to be unlocked through urban exploration. These works can be found in places across the world.

Mark Ollinger, a Calgary-born artist, explores communication with his mindbending studies on the elements of language. In both his sculptures and paintings, the architecture of letters and and interlocking forms engross in several perspectives. In several of the artist’s public works, these pieces are hidden in corners, crevices, and underneath structures, as puzzles to be unlocked through urban exploration. These works can be found in places across the world.?





Much of the artist works are either in three dimensions, or they emulate three dimensions within 2-D mediums. Whether it’s in acrylics and aerosols or the base of a coffee table, Ollinger’s optical art offer several points of entry.





A statement on the artist’s website speaks on Ollinger’s approach: “From the macroscopic study of language to the microscopic analysis of their constituent alphabets, Mark explores the conditions of language that underly our inner thoughts and outer expressions,” the statement says. “He channels the meaning, sound, and physical appearance of words into sculptural elements whose geometric intricacies reflect the complexity of human linguistic.”



On Ollinger’s Instagram page, he states it a different way. His description reads, “Breaking down the fabric of reality. Welcome to the otherside.”


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