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Zemer Peled’s Elegant Sculptures, Constructed from Porcelain Shards

Israeli artist Zemer Peled uses slivers of porcelain to emulate shapes and forms of the natural world, from feathers to leaves and petals. The result is something otherworldly, blending hues and patterns for something both familiar and strange. The delicate and organic constructions defy their actual sharp, hardened nature. These works come in differing sizes, from the size of common houseplants to towering over viewers, all made from thousands of pieces of porcelain.


Israeli artist Zemer Peled uses slivers of porcelain to emulate shapes and forms of the natural world, from feathers to leaves and petals. The result is something otherworldly, blending hues and patterns for something both familiar and strange. The delicate and organic constructions defy their actual sharp, hardened nature. These works come in differing sizes, from the size of common houseplants to towering over viewers, all made from thousands of pieces of porcelain.




In an exhibit last month at the Los Angeles gallery Mark Moore Fine Art, titled “Nomad,” The act of making for Peled is a feat of endurance, improvisation, and adaptation with the aim to embody a fleeting but fundamental feeling of mystery,” the gallery says. “The construction of her sculpture parallels negotiations any outsider makes in encountering a new world as they delicately construct a self that is both adaptable and resilient.”




The gallery adds that Peled’s process is full of “endurance, improvisation, and adaption.” She’s a recipient of the South Place Hotel Art Prize, Charlotte Fraser Award, and a Tokyo Design Week corporate award. Peled is a graduate of the Royal College of Art in London and the Bezalel Academy of Art and Design.



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