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Mister Mourao Warps Architecture Into Continuous Loops

Vasco Mourao, who goes by the moniker Mister Mourao, describes himself as “an architect turned into an artist with a tendency for obsessive drawing.” In his new series, “Ouroborus,” he combines mediums for renderings of buildings that flow in continuous loops. These structures neither begin nor end, offering countless points of entry.


Vasco Mourao, who goes by the moniker Mister Mourao, describes himself as “an architect turned into an artist with a tendency for obsessive drawing.” In his new series, “Ouroborus,” he combines mediums for renderings of buildings that flow in continuous loops. These structures neither begin nor end, offering countless points of entry.





He describes his work as such for Hi-Fructose: “Departing from my traditional medium of pen and paper, this is a new line of work that lies between a sculpture and a two dimensional drawing. By working on plywood, these pieces are freed from the typical frame and the physical limits of the pieces are integral part of the work.”


Mourao draws onto plywood after he’s already cut it. This offers confines that shapes the final product, guiding the project in a way that a typical blank canvas could not. The works were recently included in a solo show at the gallery Espacio 88 in Barcelona, Spain, where the artist is also based. Other shows have been staged at Paradise AIR in Japan, The Invisible Dog in New York, and several galleries in Spain.

The artist’s also created work for clients like Apple, The New Yorker, The Washington Post, Wired, and others.

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