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Natalia Fabia’s ‘Rainbeau Samsara’ Explores Portals to the Divine

In a new show at Corey Helford Gallery in Los Angeles, Natalia Fabia explores life cycles, from our stardust origins to death, and the natural portals that lead us to the divine. "Rainbeau Samsara," which runs through Dec. 10 at the space, blends the conventions of oil painting and pops of sparkles and glitter to reflect the transcendental nature of the work's content.

In a new show at Corey Helford Gallery in Los Angeles, Natalia Fabia explores life cycles, from our stardust origins to death, and the natural portals that lead us to the divine. “Rainbeau Samsara,” which runs through Dec. 10 at the space, blends the conventions of oil painting and pops of sparkles and glitter to reflect the transcendental nature of the work’s content.

A statement from the gallery offers some insight into what led to Fabia’s current explorations: “Natalia Fabia has been painting the female form in environments for years. After the birth of her daughter, Peribeau, and the sudden loss of her brother, her painting exploration has progressed.”





And in this pursuit, Fabia’s allowed her work to develop organically. As she combines the cosmic with the backdrop of nature, the stars, splashes, and the flora of the land evolved and changed in response. As her subjects vary in age, culture, and emotions, several narratives come together to represent a larger purpose: A representation of how one can find tranquility and access something beyond ourselves in the every day.




Or as the statement reads, in terms of the stardust of which we’re composed: “It is this stardust that links us to the planets and cosmos, to the sand and dirt of the earth, and to each other.”

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