Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Bayo’s Engrossing, Introspective Pencil Drawings

Eduardo Flores, a Mexican artist that goes by the moniker “Bayo,” crafts pencil drawings that are both vivid and mythological in content. These intricate pieces are filled with both symbolism and common, everyday items, from the hides of beasts to pop culture icons. According to the artist, the pieces “intend to take the viewer through a vigorous search for that ‘something’ that endangers our existence, portrayed by absurd juxtapositions of allegories.”

Eduardo Flores, a Mexican artist that goes by the moniker “Bayo,” crafts pencil drawings that are both vivid and mythological in content. These intricate pieces are filled with both symbolism and common, everyday items, from the hides of beasts to pop culture icons. According to the artist, the pieces “intend to take the viewer through a vigorous search for that ‘something’ that endangers our existence, portrayed by absurd juxtapositions of allegories.” The artist was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

Works like “Self” hint at this knack for introspective works, with a mythical creature looming over the subject’s shoulder. Tattooed on the art of the subject is the phrase “Ne te quaesiveris extra,” a Latin phrase that translates to “Do not look outside of yourself.” This comes from Ralph Waldo Emerson’s “Self-Reliance,” and can also be looked at as conveying the advice to simply look within one’s self. Another piece, “Tezcatlipoca,” (below) shares a name with the Aztec religion’s primary deity.

Bayo’s most recent show was “Seeking an Enemy” at Redefine Gallery in Orlando, his second with the venue. The artist’s work has been featured across the world, in the U.S., German, Belgium, Spain, Mexico, and the Netherlands.

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
Italian painter Salvatore Alessi toys with reality and abstraction in his oil works on canvas. These scenes seem to reference and subvert both the physics of the real world and an internal existence. Alessi cites names like Velasquez, Goya, Picasso, Bacon, and Freud as influences.
Oil painter Lindsay Pickett crafts distorted cityscapes that are at times taken from the artist’s dreams. His influences range from Dali and Bosch to sci-fi illustrators like Wayne Barlowe and Jim Burns. The key to crafting these pieces is not just subverting physics, Pickett says, but walking the tightrope of making them somehow convincing.
In a mid-career retrospective exhibition at the Mesa Contemporary Arts Museum, Esao Andrews offers paintings that span his career. "Petrichor," curated by Thinkspace Projects, looks at the riveting, pop surrealist output from the artist, over the past several years. The exhibition kicks off next month on May 10 and runs through Aug. 4. Andrews is featured in the Hi-Fructose Collected Volume 2 Hardcover.
Christian Rex van Minnen's paintings (featured in HF Vol. 25) are painstakingly laborious. The artist uses the techniques of the Northern Renaissance masters to paint tripped-out portraits and still lifes where his subjects devolve into bulbous, tumor-like lumps of flesh and organic matter. While Van Minnen's work is commonly interpreted as being about deformity, when we visited the artist's studio in Brooklyn a few weeks ago, he discussed the conceptual underpinnings of his creative process. Take a look at our photos from Van Minnen's studio after the jump.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List