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Blaine Fontana and David Rice Exhibit New Works in “Chromagrain” Dual Show at Svper Ordinary Gallery

Chromagrain, the latest exhibition from Svper Ordinary Gallery in Denver, brings together the stunning art of Blaine Fontana (featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 36) and David Rice (last covered on our blog here). The new works are currently on view through the end of September. View more images from the exhibition here.


Chromagrain, the latest exhibition from Svper Ordinary Gallery in Denver, brings together the stunning art of Blaine Fontana (featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 36) and David Rice (last covered on our blog here). The new works are currently on view through the end of September. View more images from the exhibition here.



Geometric patterns and color are abundant throughout the dual exhibition, as seen in works like Fontana’s “Equilateral Forestry” and Rice’s “Campground”. Nature plays a central role in the series, with multi-dimensional renderings of birds, trees, and other wildlife protruding from the gallery walls on wooden panels.



This is not the first time Fontana and Rice–both based in Portland, Oregon– have worked alongside each other. Rice is a former intern at Fontana’s art and design studio, and says his recent paintings are “an embodiment of what I have learned over the last two years working with [Fontana].” The pair have collaborated on murals for Portland’s Forest for the Trees festival and Denver’s annual Colorado Crush.



Blaine Fontana employs his street-art inspired aesthetic that melds graphic design with fine art to produce several pieces in acrylic and aerosol on birch and reclaimed wood. The artist’s contemporary works draw from “divine symbols of religious myths, worldly folklore and current social dynamics,” according to his artist statement.



David Rice‘s artworks are inspired by his deep connection to the outdoors, which he has nurtured since his childhood. In his acrylic paintings, the artist balances images of organic and artificial objects, contemplating the possibility of a harmonious coexistence between the natural world and that which is man-made.



Images courtesy of Svper Gallery.

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In its second year, Forest for the Trees, curated by gallerist Matt Wagner and artist Gage Hamilton, brought together 20 international and local artists in Portland for a few days of mural painting intended to encourage the growth of public art in a city already known for its creative flair. Unlike other street art festivals around the world, Forest for the Trees had a notable presence of artists you wouldn't necessarily put in the street art or graffiti camps.
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