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Zadok Ben-David’s Sculptures Show People He ‘Saw But Never Met’

Zadok Ben-David, a London-based artist, chose a direct title for his latest body of work: “All the people that I saw but never met.” Yet, when you see the crowd of sculptures amassed by the artist, the work takes on a metaphysical quality. Each of the individuals, created from painted stainless steel and perspex boxes, represents a distinct personality and a new, potential relationship that never was.


Zadok Ben-David, a London-based artist, chose a direct title for his latest body of work: “All the people that I saw but never met.” Yet, when you see the crowd of sculptures amassed by the artist, the work takes on a metaphysical quality. Each of the individuals, created from painted stainless steel and perspex boxes, represents a distinct personality and a new, potential relationship that never was.




There are thousands of people from countries all over the world depicted in “All the people that I saw but never met.” The whimsy of this work recalls Ben-David’s past endeavors, like this project, from the last time he appeared on Hi-Fructose.com. Whether it’s flora or fauna, humans or their animal counterparts, Ben-David has a knack for showing our profound nature in metallic elements.




This new body of work, in particular, varies in scope and size, as these people are depicted among a body of individuals in tiny sizes or as single figures that tower over bystanders. Ben-David’s strangers can be as monumental or inconsequential as the beholder wishes. He brings this work to the Annandale Galleries in Australia, Oct. 20 through Nov. 6.

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