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Andrea Wan’s Explorations of the Internal, External

Andrea Wan, a Hong Kong-born artist based in Berlin, eloquently conveys both inner dialogue and a sense of exploration in her work. Whether it’s ink and gouache paintings or murals on walls across the world, her work is marked by a mix of human bodies, disparate objects, roadways, and other structures that lead in and out of the psyche. Wan was last mentioned on Hi-Fructose.com here.

Andrea Wan, a Hong Kong-born artist based in Berlin, eloquently conveys both inner dialogue and a sense of exploration in her work. Whether it’s ink and gouache paintings or murals on walls across the world, her work is marked by a mix of human bodies, disparate objects, roadways, and other structures that lead in and out of the psyche. Wan was last mentioned on Hi-Fructose.com here.





In a 2014 interview with Rabbiteye Movement, Wan expounded on her style: “My art is like my journal of thoughts except that it’s processed through a fictional filter. Like in a dream – things might not necessary make sense but we can draw clues from the symbols and overall mood to interpret the subconscious mind.”





It’s in this point that we understand that the sense of exploration in Wan’s work is two-fold. On one hand, the subjects seem to be going through their own journey. Otherwise, viewers can unpack their own greater meanings from clues scattered throughout the works. And even in the form of public art, Wan’s work offers puzzles that make it worth stopping and gazing.

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