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Andrea Myers’ Fabric Sculptures Play with Color, Dimension

Andrea Myers is an artist and self-described "maker" based in Ohio. Blending forms of sculpture, painting and fiber arts, she creates collage-like sculptures, wall hangings and installations that explore the space between the two- and three-dimensional. Her works also reflect her deep interest in the process of manipulating "flat" materials, such as fabrics, felt, wood and paper, to create dynamic, multi-dimensional works of art.


Andrea Myers is an artist and self-described “maker” based in Ohio. Blending forms of sculpture, painting and fiber arts, she creates collage-like sculptures, wall hangings and installations that explore the space between the two- and three-dimensional. Her works also reflect her deep interest in the process of manipulating “flat” materials, such as fabrics, felt, wood and paper, to create dynamic, multi-dimensional works of art.





Myers’ technicolor creations are vibrant and pulsating with life: some melt and drip as if they were paintings not yet fully dry; others appear to emanate from a central point, drawing the viewer deeper into the work. At times, the sculptures subvert the traditional ways in which we view art within an exhibition setting. Pieces that are “cracked” open to reveal the bright fabrics within them encourage the audience to “step into” the work, breaking boundaries between viewer and subject while injecting color into a generally neutral gallery environment. While many of her sculptures incorporate themes of movement and nature, they are intentionally abstract so as to allow for open interpretation from her audience.



Many of the materials Myers works with are pieces left over from other projects or gifted to her by friends. The artist alternates between hand cutting and gluing her materials in thick layers and using a sewing machine or jigsaw to make fabric collages or cut shapes from wood. The relationship between handmade and mechanical, organic and artificial, become important concepts explored within Myers’ work.



Talking with Other Peoples Pixels, the artist discussed how she evolved from working in two dimensional to three dimensional pieces: “I began my pursuits as an artist, taking classes in mainly painting and printmaking and finishing my BFA at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. I found myself more engaged in the processes I was learning in my printmaking classes than with the actual resulting prints I was making…”

“In stages, I found myself stepping off of the flatness of the wall and growing my work out into dimensional space. I began layering materials that I felt comfortable with, mainly paper. I experimented using the materials in multiple, rather than using paper solely as a means to make repetitions of imagery. The paper and then fabric became the subject matter, like painting in dimensional space, creating sculptural objects that relate to the color and forms found in painting.”



Myers holds a BFA in print media and MFA in fiber and material studies from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. View more of her work on her website.

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