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Robert Proch’s Dynamic, Colorful Murals and Paintings

Robert Proch is a muralist, painter, and animator who lives and works in Poznan, Poland. His dynamic creations, featuring human figures and city landscapes, constantly push the boundaries of what we define as "street art" and "fine art" - whether they're adorning the side of a building or displayed in a more traditional gallery setting. Proch is influenced by both genres, pulling from these two worlds to produce his unique, expressive pieces.


Robert Proch is a muralist, painter, and animator who lives and works in Poznan, Poland. His dynamic creations, featuring human figures and city landscapes, constantly push the boundaries of what we define as “street art” and “fine art” – whether they’re adorning the side of a building or displayed in a more traditional gallery setting. Proch is influenced by both genres, pulling from these two worlds to produce his unique, expressive pieces.



The artist’s futuristic-looking, “glitchy” paintings call to mind aesthetics of digital animation (the artist studied animation at the Academy of Fine Arts in Poznan). Intersecting people with fragmented geometric shapes, Proch also uses his distinct style to blur the lines between abstraction and realism. As noted in his biography by Kirk Gallery, “Proch’s style is inspired by state-of-the-art animation as much as classic caricature, and impressionism as much as modernist graffiti. The mini-narratives he paints examine the modern human condition using vivid colors and tangible emotions… and presents an emotional reality that remains pleasing and easy to identify.”




Proch was born in 1986. While he has also produced animated videos, his success with murals and works on canvas has led him to dedicate more time to these mediums in recent years. Proch’s work has been exhibited in Munich, Los Angeles, Paris, San Francisco, and Warsaw.




View more of Proch’s work on his website and Instagram.

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