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Philip Jackson’s Dramatic Sculptures Loom and Enchant

Scotland-born sculptor Philip Jackson has crafted faithful depictions of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Mahatma Gandhi, and Sir Matt Busby and served as the Royal Sculptor to Queen Elizabeth II. Yet, Jackson’s also known for his modernist, dramatic gallery works, with characters that are less specific and in many cases, eerie and haunting. The quality present each of these works is Jackson’s seasoned knack for form and inspiring awe.


Scotland-born sculptor Philip Jackson has crafted faithful depictions of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Mahatma Gandhi, and Sir Matt Busby and served as the Royal Sculptor to Queen Elizabeth II. Yet, Jackson’s also known for his modernist, dramatic gallery works, with characters that are less specific and in many cases, eerie and haunting. The quality present each of these works is Jackson’s seasoned knack for form and inspiring awe.




Whether it’s the contemplative figure of “Moonstruck” or “The Sentinels,” a brooding trio of nun-like beings that are chilling even when set against a daytime backdrop, several of Jackson’s figures absorb viewers in their size (often nearing 8 feet) and posture. The nun-like figures loom in broad daylight with elegance, cast in bronze and utilizing shadows in varying ways, depending on location. Flashes of gold, whether adorning the face or hands of the beings, add to their enigmatic nature. And at times, Jackson’s sculptures appear mid-scene, fixed in ongoing conversation or dutiful, shared reflection.


Jackson’s work has been exhibited all over the world, from ArtCatto in Portugal and The Portland Gallery in London to Casanova Gardens in Venice and the Naples Philharmonic Centre in Florida. The artist now creates his work and resides in West Sussex.




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