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Yok & Sheryo Bring Gnarly Cartoons Into Reality

Dubbing themselves “professional spraycationers,” Yok & Sheryo inject pops of cartoon joy into everyday life. Their Fruit and Vegetables La-la land in Singapore is an explosive example of what happens when the pair can run wild, tapping both their inner-children and actual youth from the area to make the creations. Their work can also be seen on public walls across the world, and on Instagram—documenting their adventures under the moniker “spacecandy.” They were last featured on HiFructose.com here.


Dubbing themselves “professional spraycationers,” Yok & Sheryo inject pops of cartoon joy into everyday life. Their Fruit and Vegetables La-la land in Singapore is an explosive example of what happens when the pair can run wild, tapping both their inner-children and actual youth from the area to make the creations. Their work can also be seen on public walls across the world, and on Instagram—documenting their adventures under the moniker “spacecandy.” They were last featured on HiFructose.com here.




Separately, each artist offers both a singular perspective and seasoned style to each piece. Sheryo, a Singapore native, has been doing street art for past 11 years, switching between mediums and riffing on skateboarding graphics and pulp illustration. Yok, an Australian-born artist, cites skateboarding graphics as an influence, too, along with animated TV programs like Ren & Stimpy. They met in 2010 in Singapore.




Other 3D projects include the Arnie-Truckanator, a massive truck sculpture in Los Angeles, and Surf Shack, an installation that was part of the show DUO at Thinkspace Gallery this year. The makeshift shack was inspired by the pair’s trips to Indonesia. Recent murals have hit both their native countries and the States, in New York City and Los Angeles. In each piece, the zany, engrossing, vibrant characters, whether they’re hot dogs, bananas, or dragons, makes the surrounding block a bit more surreal.



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