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Erika Sanada’s ‘Cover My Eyes’ Offers New Endearing, Unsettling Creatures

In Erika Sanada’s “Cover My Eyes,” running through July 30 at Modern Eden Gallery in San Francisco, viewers find a new batch of ceramic sculptures from the Japanese artist. Sanada's “dogs” typically feature at least one physical mutation and represent ongoing anxieties in the artist's life. She explains the addition of new animals this time around: “The rats and birds present with the dogs are further extensions of myself and my fears. Birds, like my anxieties, are difficult to contain and control, and are always a part of me and my work.” The artist was featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 31.

In Erika Sanada’s “Cover My Eyes,” running through July 30 at Modern Eden Gallery in San Francisco, viewers find a new batch of ceramic sculptures from the Japanese artist. Sanada’s “dogs” typically feature at least one physical mutation and represent ongoing anxieties in the artist’s life. She explains the addition of new animals this time around: “The rats and birds present with the dogs are further extensions of myself and my fears. Birds, like my anxieties, are difficult to contain and control, and are always a part of me and my work.” The artist was featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 31.




Sanada, a Tokyo native, had her first solo show at the same gallery in 2013. Her creatures have frequently balanced the creepy and the adorable. She last appeared on HiFructose.com here, a look at the artist’s newer explorations of color. A studio visit from last year, which can be found here, offers some insight into her process, from sketchpad to sculpture. Find the artist on Instagram here.




Sanada attended Nihon University College of Art in Tokyo, graduating in 2009. She then moved on to work as a makeup artist at a film studio and work as a commercial illustrator before relocating to San Francisco. Even today, her creations have a cinematic quality.



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