Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Esther Sarto’s Writhing, Supernatural Scenes

Esther Sarto, a 24-year-old painter based in Copenhagen, creates gouache and watercolor works that are often as unsettling as they are elegant. Sarto, once known as “Miss Take” as a street artist, often uses bare, entangled humans and plant-life to express her sentiments. ”I am not a very verbal person,” she told WEAART. “There are a lot of issues you can express better without words. Often the meaning lays between the lines.”

Esther Sarto, a 24-year-old painter based in Copenhagen, creates gouache and watercolor works that are often as unsettling as they are elegant. Sarto, once known as “Miss Take” as a street artist, often uses bare, entangled humans and plant-life to express her sentiments. ”I am not a very verbal person,” she told WEAART. “There are a lot of issues you can express better without words. Often the meaning lays between the lines.”




“Forest of Obscurity,” with its wooded settings and writhing subjects, offers a taste of the worlds Sarto creates. The supernatural rises out of the natural, as morphed bodies create something entirely new upon inspection. The series “End of Virtue” takes a darker turn, as huddled naked bodies create a grand pyramid and the rich dine on various body parts against a red backdrop in “Carnivores.” She often depicts her process and works-in-progress on Instagram.




Sarto’s pen on paper works can be just as starring, evidences in the striking “Human Nature,” flora constructing the image of a human. A similar image was recently translated to a massive mural by Sarto, towering over streets on a wall in Denmark. Sarto’s also done illustrative work for Medium, The New Republic, Material Girl Magazine, Aalborg Kommune, and others.




Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
In 2016, the watercolors of Moira Hahn recall the woodblock prints of Japan’s Edo period, which ended nearly 150 years ago. Even with endearing, anthropomorphic animals in the place of human warriors or villagers, there’s a refined quality to the work that feels centuries-formed. And hidden within these pieces, you’ll often find charming, humorous narratives and modern-day commentary.
Currently living in Colombia, John Barrios (previously covered here) portrays a surreal world rich with color and detail in his oil paintings. He strips down this world in his haunting black and white mixed media drawings. Barrios' drawings, a combination of Graph Gear 500 mechanical pencil and watercolor, look similar to the under layers of his painted works. Their soft shading and light values reflect on his fascination with the subtleties of light. See more after the jump.
Since 2009, Urban Forms Gallery has been transforming the landscape of Polish city Lodz with a pulsing wave of colorful, graphic images. Puerto Rican muralist Alexis Diaz (previously covered by HF) is the latest in a string of internationally-known street artists including Brazil's Os Gemeos, Belgium's ROA, and Australia's SHIDA, to have been invited to touch his brush to Poland's walls. Diaz's mural, entitled "Sentir," is part of world-wide series, "HOY." Translated to "Today," Diaz's current series is a personal reflection of the way in which the artist sees the world. Following murals in Vienna, France, the US, UK, Australia, and Tunisia, "Sentir," which translates to "to feel," is an affecting tribute to the ties between the natural world and human sensation.
Stuart Holland's stirring charcoal drawings and watercolor works packed Arch Enemy Arts this month in a show titled "Elsew(here)." The Idaho artist crafts quiet, cerebral scenes, each its own introspective and metaphysical exploration. The show ends on June 1.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List