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Tezi Gabunia’s Surreal Photographs of Giant Heads in Galleries

Tbilisi, Georgia based artist Tezi Gabunia's latest project not only invites you to go inside of an art gallery, but become the art, too. "Put Your Head into Gallery" features identical miniature sets of some of the world's most famous galleries such as the Louvre, the Tate Modern, Saatchi Gallery, and Gagosian, which he then places a model's head inside of and photographs. The result is a surreal series of images of giant human heads peering into galleries, recalling Eric White's miniature exhibits.

Tbilisi, Georgia based artist Tezi Gabunia’s latest project not only invites you to go inside of an art gallery, but become the art, too. “Put Your Head into Gallery” features identical miniature sets of some of the world’s most famous galleries such as the Louvre, the Tate Modern, Saatchi Gallery, and Gagosian, which he then places a model’s head inside of and photographs. The result is a surreal series of images of giant human heads peering into galleries, recalling Eric White’s miniature exhibits.

Gabunia’s project was created using laser cutting technology and materials such as PVC, plexiglass, wooden paper, and two-component glue to create the four galleries, which showcase exhibits by different artists including Rubens, Damien Hirst, Lichtenstein, and Gabunia’s own. In collaboration with his team- Andro Eradze, Saba Shengelia, Chipo Pelicano, Giorgi Machavariani, and Ani Beridze- Tezi Gabunia often uses various mediums for producing his work.

“Put Your Head into Gallery” represents the artist’s ongoing exploration of hyperrealism. The miniatures are an example of the artist’s self-described “Falsification” style, referring to the false environment of spaces which don’t exist, and provide the backdrop for images that suspend belief. He shares, “Analogical models of these galleries are easily transportable and convenient, so they are available for everyone to visit. Moreover, anyone can put their head into gallery, Take a photo and become an exhibit.”

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