Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Artist JR Makes the Louvre’s Famous Glass Pyramid Disappear

The Louvre's famous giant glass pyramid, designed by Chinese-American architect I.M. Pei, became a landmark of the city of Paris in 1989- until it was made invisible by French street artist JR last week. The artist's installation is a trick of the eye, a gigantic paper photograph of the Louvre Museum covering the pyramid as part of JR's "artist takeover". Featured here on our blog, JR is well known for monumental black and white pastings covering buildings all over the world.

The Louvre’s famous giant glass pyramid, designed by Chinese-American architect I.M. Pei, became a landmark of the city of Paris in 1989- until it was made invisible by French street artist JR last week. The artist’s installation is a trick of the eye, a gigantic paper photograph of the Louvre Museum covering the pyramid as part of JR’s “artist takeover”. Featured here on our blog, JR is well known for monumental black and white pastings covering buildings all over the world.


“By erasing the Louvre Pyramid, I am highlighting the way Pei made the Louvre relevant for his time, while bringing the Louvre back to its original state.”

When invited by the “biggest museum in the world”, JR, who is a fan of I.M. Pei, immediately set his sights on the pyramid: “When arriving at the Louvre, people will all notice the absence and I’m curious to see how they will react. Hundreds of tourists take selfies with the pyramid everyday, so I wanted to make it harder for them. I want them to actively look for it and talk to each other while moving around to find the best spot to take the picture,” he shares.

“Making the Pyramid disappear is a way for me to distance myself from my subject. The feud between traditional and modern tastes in art and architecture is nothing new. The Pyramid, Buren’s columns at the Palais-Royal, and the Pompidou Center- all of these caused controversy.”

“My work is about transmitting history to better understand the present, and find echoes with our own times. What happened in the past is part of a broader context that can still have relevance for today. By erasing the Louvre Pyramid, I am highlighting the way Pei made the Louvre relevant for his time, while bringing the Louvre back to its original state.” JR’s artwork, which was unveiled on May 28th, will remain in place through June 28th.


Photo credit: David Emeran

Meta
Topics
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
Both based in Berlin by way of Australia, Two One and Reka (see our recent studio visit here) are exhibiting together at StolenSpace Gallery in London in two concurrent solo shows: Reka's "Trip the Light" and Two One's "The Hunted Hunter's Head." Inspired by the graceful movements of dancers from a young age, Reka (whose mother was a ballerina) presents a series of paintings that pay homage to the fluid, abstract shapes the body can make. His Cubist-inspired paintings might have one imagining a toe-tapping soundtrack of jazz or even the swell of a symphony, but Reka tempers these allusions to older, more traditional art forms with gritty paint textures that evoke his graffiti roots.
London based street artist D*Face recently paid his first ever visit to Mexico to participate in the Dual Year UKMX 2015. The event is a multi faceted program designed to bring more cultural, academic, and commercial projects from the United Kingdom to Mexico. At the same time, Mexico promotes culture, innovation and Mexican commerce in various cities throughout the United Kingdom. D*Face's large scale mural for the project, titled "Catrina", takes up the length of an entire building in the Roma neighborhood. His depiction of a highly glamorized, deathly feminine character combines his macabre pop portraits with traditional Mexican elements.
While it's possible to observe trees growing over the course of months and years, German artist David Stegmann aka Dust paints roots, branches and vines as sentient beings caught amid a state of evolution. In Dust's two latest murals, "Wohnzimmerwelten" and "Witness the Fitness," (both completed in Germany in the past two months) his otherworldly trees sprawl out across long walls (one of the pieces is 32 meters long) with force and momentum. The murals preceded the opening of Dust's current show, "Concrete Jungle," with Patricia Sandonis at Galerie Merkle in Stuttgart, Germany. Endowing plants with movement and speed is Dust's signature. The high-velocity branches take on new forms, reminding viewers of the powers that lie in the soil, the roots and the trees.
Berlin-based artist Vermibus shocks passersby with haunting public interventions, in which he replaces fashion advertisements with his own manipulated versions. To create the staggering, sometimes startling images, Vermibus splashes a solvent across the printed surface. The chemical reaction causes the faces and flesh of models, as well as the logos and brands they represent, to wash away. This process can be viewed in a video produced by Open Walls Gallery in Berlin.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List