Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Jeremiah Quarshie’s Highly Realistic Portraits of Ghanaian Women

Ghanaian artist Jeremiah Quarshie finds the inspiration for his paintings in his immediate environment. Living and working in Accra, the capital of Ghana, his highly realistic acrylic portraits depict models, typically ordinary women, in roles of beauty queens, businesswomen, and laborers alike. In his own words, the people in his portraits are characters representing the “foundations of society into pools of utter elegance", 21st century workers and fictional women.

Ghanaian artist Jeremiah Quarshie finds the inspiration for his paintings in his immediate environment. Living and working in Accra, the capital of Ghana, his highly realistic acrylic portraits depict models, typically ordinary women, in roles of beauty queens, businesswomen, and laborers alike. In his own words, the people in his portraits are characters representing the “foundations of society into pools of utter elegance”, 21st century workers and fictional women.

Working from original photographs taken in his studio, Quarshie further describes his work as a combination between reality and fantasy or his imagination: “Staged photographs on occasion serve as complete works of art. Some of these photographs are created by superimposing Ghanaian elements on other non Ghanaian contexts creating rather unusual situations in very unique ways.”

“Yellow is the Colour of Water” is the title of Quarshie’s new body of work, portraits which address “broader questions of hope in failing political systems.” He explains, “Rituals are often associated with commerce, social status, social problems, fashion and technology. Ironical contexts can be seen when one singles out an everyday practice. The contexts are usually found in everyday Ghanaian life.” His solo show “Yellow is the Colour of Water” will open at Gallery 1957, Accra, on August 18th.

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
What does it mean to be "normal"? Normality is different to different people, generally applying to what is considered acceptable and not out of the ordinary. To Los Angeles based artist Wyatt Mills, the idea of being "normal" has a broad meaning that he addresses in his latest series of chaotic mixed media paintings. Mills is an artist that likes to make observations about the human psyche, relating his work to a reflection of his reality which is never one thing and switches between different styles.
"I believe that artists should speak about the most desperate and desirable issues for humanity," says Korean painter Kwon Kyung-Yup. Though known for her realistic portraits of melancholy subjects, first featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 24, Kwon describes herself as a happy person whose paintings are about recalling memories. Her works find an emotional balance between her artistic inspirations, citing the beauty in Klimt's paintings which she pairs with tragedy, as found in the works of Caravaggio.
The Winnipeg Art Gallery (WAG) in Canada is currently exhibiting some of hyperrealist sculptor Ron Mueck's most poignant works to date. The Australia born artist, recently featured in HF Vol. 30, is well known for his larger-than-life fiberglass portrait sculptures of life's key stages. This new exhibition, named "NGC@WAG: Ron Mueck" for its cooperation with the National Gallery of Canada, offers attendees a rare look at the process behind Mueck's work, including his original maquettes and studies.
Yasmine Weiss describes her works as “pretty realistic but not quite.” These oil paintings and drawings carry a surreal quality, with touches of the intimate and the disconcerting. Weiss says she has always had a fascination with humanity, and as being hard-pressed to explain why is part of the engine that fuels her work.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List