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Taylor White’s Latest Series of Expressive Portraits of Bodies

Movement and expression are key characteristics in the work of North Carolina based painter Taylor White. Featured here on our blog, her paintings and murals are instantly recognizable for her chaotic portrayal of bodies which appear to break apart. White has said that she sees the human body as a fragile form, describing her work as an exploration of our emotions.

Movement and expression are key characteristics in the work of North Carolina based painter Taylor White. Featured here on our blog, her paintings and murals are instantly recognizable for her chaotic portrayal of bodies which appear to break apart. White has said that she sees the human body as a fragile form, describing her work as an exploration of our emotions.

White will make her US solo debut with her show entitled “Querencia”, opening at Art Whino Gallery at Blind Whino in Washington DC on June 25th. Here, the artist works with a bright palette of blues, pinks and purples, colors often associated with the emotion of passion. The show’s comes from the Spanish verb “querer”, which means “to desire.” White’s paintings- she calls them “portraits”- also express emotion in physical terms as bodies touch and intertwine, perhaps in lovemaking.

In her artist statement, she says her work is “influenced heavily by experiences in improvisational dance, White bases her visual vocabulary on the exquisitely expressive movements of the human figure. Combining refined techniques of classical training with bright, unexpected color choices born of a street art and pop culture influence, White’s work is a bold and kinetic pursuit of the delicate harmonies that exist in that sweet spot between order and chaos.”

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