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Diego Cirulli Explores the Definition of “Hollow” in New Works

In painting the world around him, Argentinian artist Diego Cirulli is sensitive to the temporal nature of things. His large-scale oil paintings represent Circulli's unique experience of reality: a collage of the artist's memories and the people he is with, often with eyes closed or obscured entirely, as if to suggest that our vision is not a crucial component to our perception of life. "Imagery is the possibility of generating a crack in the surface of a given reality," Cirulli says.

In painting the world around him, Argentinian artist Diego Cirulli is sensitive to the temporal nature of things. His large-scale oil paintings represent Circulli’s unique experience of reality: a collage of the artist’s memories and the people he is with, often with eyes closed or obscured entirely, as if to suggest that our vision is not a crucial component to our perception of life. “Imagery is the possibility of generating a crack in the surface of a given reality,” Cirulli says.

Cirulli approaches his art making much as he does his own life, living in the moment with no knowledge of how things will turn out. Each image is conceived with little direction, only a vague idea that develops as he completes the painting- he likens it to filling an empty “void”, the focus of his new body of work entitled “Hollow”. The series presents an abstract visualization of the various definitions of the term: “Make void, Holding nothing, Reverberant, To become…” are a few that the artist offers to viewers.

“Emptiness is a composition and conceptual category,” Cirulli explains, describing his work as exploring the relationship between “internal” visual elements that come from his mind, and “external” or those relating to his environment, a gallery space, and so on. “I feel that the painting is always evolving and I can not stop it. I can not imagine fully completed images, although they take form in the end. I try to live with what I do and that is not static, it changes as time passes. I think there dwells reality.” “Hollow” is on view at BC Gallery in Berlin through July 9th.

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