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How & Nosm Debut Intricate New Paintings and Mural in Detroit

It's a common belief that twins share some sort of unexplained mental, even spiritual connection. Identical twin brothers and artists How and Nosm (Raoul and Davide Perre) were raised together and also sharing the passion for art, have a connection and dynamic that is unique. It certainly explains their highly singular vision: dynamic artworks and massive, global murals that are instantly recognizable for their use of red, black and white based imagery featuring intricate patterns and shapes.

It’s a common belief that twins share some sort of unexplained mental, even spiritual connection. Identical twin brothers and artists How and Nosm (Raoul and Davide Perre) were raised together and also sharing the passion for art, have a connection and dynamic that is unique. It certainly explains their highly singular vision: dynamic artworks and massive, global murals that are instantly recognizable for their use of red, black and white based imagery featuring intricate patterns and shapes.

In our interview with How & Nosm, they told us, “There is a mutual understanding in solving issues regarding a project without exchanging too many words. Our similar and shared life experiences demand little communication and since we can relate to them equally our ideas are naturally harmonic.” Though mentally “in sync”, every piece they create is also a balance between their individual personalities, which they explore in their current solo at Library Street Collective, “In Between.” The show features 12 new paintings, drawings, and a massive mural in Detroit, their largest to date, that took one week to complete.

“Neither of us is the leading force but instead our focus is on teamwork so that we both together can be successful in our daily work routine. The individual ego is set aside,” they say. “So if we feel like a drawing or layout from one of us is stronger neither of us will take it personally or be offended by it. Accepting that certain drawings are simply better fitting for an outside mural or a painting guarantees the high level of quality that we always try to gain as a team. It is not like we always share the work 50/50 constantly, but more of a joint effort to help each other out to eliminate weaknesses. By teaching each other, we can evolve even faster.”

How & Nosm are now showing at Library Street Collective in Detroit through June 12th, 2016.

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