Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Yuichi Ikehata’s Powerful Sculptures of Physical Fragments

Japanese sculptor and photographer Yuichi Ikehata creates chilling scenes that bridge the gap between reality and fiction. In his surreal ongoing series “Fragment of Long Term Memory," his intention is to comment on the fragmentary nature of memory and render it physical. "Many parts of our memories… are often forgotten, or difficult to recall. I retrieve those fragmented moments and reconstruct them as surreal images. I gather these misplaced memories from certain parts of our reality, and together they create a non-linear story, resonating with each other in my photographs," he says.

Japanese sculptor and photographer Yuichi Ikehata creates chilling scenes that bridge the gap between reality and fiction. In his surreal ongoing series “Fragment of Long Term Memory,” his intention is to comment on the fragmentary nature of memory and render it physical. “Many parts of our memories… are often forgotten, or difficult to recall. I retrieve those fragmented moments and reconstruct them as surreal images. I gather these misplaced memories from certain parts of our reality, and together they create a non-linear story, resonating with each other in my photographs,” he says.

Currently living and working in Chiba, Japan, Ikehata uses wire to provide the scaffolding for a human form (modeled after himself) before covering it with paper and clay in a fragmentary fashion. The effect is simultaneously destructive and exploratory. While these sculptures seem to decay, they also highlight the physical form. Ikehata aims to explore the blurred distinction between reality and fiction: “Reality is a key to access the unrealistic world, and unreality is also a key to access reality.” In the space between reality and unreality exists Ikehata’s sculptures—they are human, yet industrial; they are intimate, yet alienating.

There is a sense of desperation present in many of his sculptures; splayed fingers, contorted toes, a hostile grimace. In the most ambitious of his sculptures, the full-form of a human body, the figure seems almost to be blowing away, flesh falling away to reveal a mechanical under-structure. The ghostly white pallor and blank stares of these sculptural self-portraits suggest a certain morbidity. Despite, or perhaps because of, this darkness, a poetic sensibility runs throughout Ikehata’s series: “I collect the fragments,” he says. “Edit, arrange, and capture them.”

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
Before the cyanotype was popularized by artists like Robert Rauschenberg, Susan Derges and Florian Neusüss in the 1960s, it was used by architects, astronomers and botanists. It is therefore fitting that contemporary artist Tasha Lewis appropriates this method of camera-less photography to make anthropological sculptures. To transform her two-dimensional cyanotypes into three-dimensional objects, Lewis uses mixed-media paper, tape, wood, and wire to build the forms of human portraits, birds in flight and thawing animals, among other shapes and characters. She then uses a photochemical reduction process to print on cloth, which she hand-sews and patchworks together. The artist refers to this outer layer as the "skin" of her sculptures.
Netherlands-based artist Pim Palsgraaf created both 2D and 3D work that tackles urbanization and the effect “development” has on the world around us. His "Multiscape" series, in particular, is informed partially by the artist living in the industrial part of Rotterdam. The series highlights the “outgrowths of urban architecture.”

Debra Baxter

Through two concurrent shows, Roq La Rue Gallery shows a pair of artists whose work carries crystalline forms. Debra Baxter's "Ghost Heart" and Rebecca Chaperon's "Incandescence" take over the gallery in April. Baxter’s sculptures, sometimes wearable, integrate natural forms into objects packed with both centuries-old narratives and humor. Chaperon’s surreal paintings share in Baxter’s fascination with the mystical, while also exploring escapism and the light and dark natures of the world.
In the imagination of 1986, Frankenstein creatures made of sheeps' skulls, spoons and scrap metal inhabit a world populated by steel flowers and paper birds. Georgie Seccull (aka 1986) is the Melbourne-based artist behind the fantastic installations, whose gigantic scale and raw aesthetic are reminiscent of prehistoric times. Using a combination of salvaged and recycled materials, 1986 builds installations with eccentric materials like computer parts and utensils for the wings of beetles. By merging organic matter like bamboo leaves, acorns and kumquats with modern instruments used in technology and mechanics, 1986 hurls forces of the past and future together to create otherworldly beings in the present.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List