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Toni Spyra’s Thought-Provoking Installations of Objects out of Context

Linz, Austria based German artist Toni Spyra transforms the stuff we see and use everyday into conceptual installations and sculptures. His works have appeared on the streets and in places where objects are completely out of context and with a twist of humor, provoking us to consider their usefulness beyond their design. Of his work's amusing qualities, Spyra says that he sees jokes as a perfect approach to art- though his kind of work may not strike a chord with everyone who encounters it, is it undeniably attention-grabbing for its unconventionality.


“AMBITION”

Linz, Austria based German artist Toni Spyra transforms the stuff we see and use everyday into conceptual installations and sculptures. His works have appeared on the streets and in places where objects are completely out of context and with a twist of humor, provoking us to consider their usefulness beyond their design. Of his work’s amusing qualities, Spyra says that he sees jokes as a perfect approach to art- though his kind of work may not strike a chord with everyone who encounters it, is it undeniably attention-grabbing for its unconventionality.


“CONSUMPTION”

By displacing things like the McDonald’s arch, ATM machines, carpets, horse saddles, staircases, and even food, Spyra intends to irritate his viewers where we are disconnected from what is familiar, and uncover what he calls a “hidden potential” in things. The title of each project points to a concept that the artist is taking into question; ideas like environmental cleanliness (“Tidy”), social withdrawal (“Leave Me Alone”), heaven and religion (“Heaven”), and the outcomes of our career goals (“Career”).


“HEAVEN”

In his artist statement, Spyra explains: “This paradox signals change the perceptual habits of the viewers – simultaneously the recognition is promoted. At the moment of attention the audience discovers a new way of seeing and thinking as well as new using approaches. At second glance, the overall image becomes accessible and the viewer realizes how Toni Spyra conveys his own concerns about social problems and human habits.”


“ATM”


“CAREER”


“DIRTY”


“HIGH HORSE”


“LEAVE ME ALONE”


“LIABILITY”


“NEGLECT”


“SIMULATOR”


“SOUP”


“TIDY”

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