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Kai & Sunny’s Latest Nature-Inspired Pen Drawings Are Mesmerizing

London based artist duo Kai & Sunny like the idea of showing something you can’t actually see and asking bigger questions. Featured here on our blog, their nature-inspired drawings feature geometric patterns that replicate motifs like the intricacies of flower petals and the dramatic bursts of stars, as if looking through the lens of a super-telescope. Though their energetic and abstract line work has the precision of a machine, everything is drawn by hand using ballpoint pens. For their upcoming exhibition at Stolen Space gallery in London, "Whirlwind Of Time", the duo sought out to develop their pen drawing series even further.

London based artist duo Kai & Sunny like the idea of showing something you can’t actually see and asking bigger questions. Featured here on our blog, their nature-inspired drawings feature geometric patterns that replicate motifs like the intricacies of flower petals and the dramatic bursts of stars, as if looking through the lens of a super-telescope. Though their energetic and abstract line work has the precision of a machine, everything is drawn by hand using ballpoint pens. For their upcoming exhibition at Stolen Space gallery in London, “Whirlwind Of Time”, the duo sought out to develop their pen drawing series even further.

“I would say it’s our most ambitious show to date. This is due to the size and level of detail in the new original works,” Kai shared in an email to Hi-Fructose. “We are thrilled to have worked with David Mitchell again (author of Cloud Atlas) on a new story for the show. David has written the short story in response to the works. The show is called “Whirlwind Of Time” and the short story David has written is called “My Eye On You”.” Their new series, which debuts on March 3rd, features drawings of continuous tidal-like waves and sun bursts that look like giant pupils staring into a never-ending abyss of line and color.

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