Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Alexei Sovertkov’s Photographs Inspired by Renaissance Portraits

It has been said that the Renaissance witnessed the rediscovery of the individual and is considered the first great age of portraiture. Inspired by master artists like Jan van Eyck, Rogier van der Weyden, and Hans Holbein, Moscow based photographer Alexei Sovertkov creates magnificent portrayals of the people around him. In his series titled "Digiclassicism", Sovertkov presents himself and his close friends in digital portraits that remix historical depictions.

It has been said that the Renaissance witnessed the rediscovery of the individual and is considered the first great age of portraiture. Inspired by master artists like Jan van Eyck, Rogier van der Weyden, and Hans Holbein, Moscow based photographer Alexei Sovertkov creates magnificent portrayals of the people around him. In his series titled “Digiclassicism”, Sovertkov presents himself and his close friends in digital portraits that remix historical depictions. His photographs share ideals of the individual and concepts of beauty with that of their Dutch and Flemish Renaissance counterparts, their distant gazes and delicately modeled features expressing hints of an interior life.

While many of the images are purely classical, others feature a combination of old and new- instead of holding quill pens, model ships, and other motifs of the period, some of Sovertkov’s subjects hold items like a laptop, stylus pen, chocolate bar, and nail file. Some of their costumes have been updated as well, where the photographer dresses them in designer label shawls and bath towels, wrapped around their hair and shoulders as if they were luxurious finery. Sovertkov’s portraits are no longer the types of images reserved for the social elite, presenting regular people in an esteemed light where they assume a new importance.

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
Mary Waters' portraits of Renaissance identical twins are intriguing, almost haunting. It is said that during the Renaissance, twins were thought to be the product of sexual promiscuity and therefore evil (The Shining anyone?). Most likely, we don't see portraits of twins because they could not survive rudimentary birth. Waters clearly prefers working in Romanticism and Renaissance styles and mediums; acrylic, tempera, alkyd, and oil painted with a satiny sheen. However, she is set apart from the masters who inspire her.
Pennsylvania based photographer Peter Olson has found a unique way of presenting his photographic prints. Also a sculptor, he doesn't stop at traditional photo paper- his photo-montages of people and places he's visited are produced on a series of ceramics that he calls "Photo Ceramica". Olson's photos are encased on each piece, left by ink from prints that, when fired, burn away and leave a permanent image from the iron oxide in the ink. The form of a three-dimensional object, such as an urn or a plate, instantly makes his photo works more dynamic and complex.
London based photo-collage artist Jess Littlewood takes us into a spacey alternate dimension. These prismatic future worlds, dotted with geodomes, are her vision of a failed Utopia that is perpetually doomed. Littlewood's images are the result of built up layers of found images which she exhaustively archives. Alien crafts and upside-down pyramids hover in forboding skies overhead and forests burn in the background, while abandoned landscapes show little sign of survival below.
Mexican born artist Daniel Barreto, now living and working in Boston, creates photo manipulations that express his desire to reconnect to nature. His works combine the use of traditional mediums used to create his subjects with that of technology. Barreto describes his images as naïve, even childlike. "I hope to provoke an inner curiosity by examining the interactions between humans and nature, or the lack thereof," he writes in his artist statement. His most recent series, "Lonely Islands", makes these observations with a simple concept. The series portrays mysteriously lonesome islands, disconnected and floating through the vastness of space.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List