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Flora Borsi Has Animal Eyes in Striking Photo Manipulations

Budapest, Hungary based photographer Flora Borsi specializes in digital photography and photo manipulations, where she seeks to visualize the physically impossible. We first featured her work on our Tumblr blog, a surreal series that imagined what the "real life models" of abstract artists Pablo Picasso, Amedeo Modigliani, Rudolf Hausner, and Kazimir Malevich might have looked liked. Her new series, titled "Animeyed (self portraits)" digitally overlaps images of the artist's own face with animals into a single "animal eye".

Budapest, Hungary based photographer Flora Borsi specializes in digital photography and photo manipulations, where she seeks to visualize the physically impossible. We first featured her work on our Tumblr blog, a surreal series that imagined what the “real life models” of abstract artists Pablo Picasso, Amedeo Modigliani, Rudolf Hausner, and Kazimir Malevich might have looked liked. Her new series, titled “Animeyed (self portraits)” digitally overlaps images of the artist’s own face with animals into a single “animal eye”. The eyes of animals like snakes, cats, rabbits, fish, and birds bring out different animalistic qualities of Borsi’s character, who matches their persona with colorful makeup and hair styles. Her work has often featured the female body and she plays with hiding and revealing the eyes or face to leave only the feminine form, exploring questions of female representation and the relationship between body and self. At her website, she shares, “The editor software is just a tool to complete my pictures, I want to make an image, which looks like a real, unedited photo. I would like to shock people or make them smile with some society critics. My goal is to inspire the viewer to think, to feel what I felt.”

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