Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Dorian Vallejo Paints Our Subconscious as a Fantastic Dreamworld

Pennsylvania based artist Dorian Vallejo paints the realm of our subconscious as a dreamworld of floating figures, forests and natural motifs. Though his subject matter and style has evolved and shifted between Hyperealism and Surrealism, one element remains the same and that is his interest in feminine beauty, and the beauty of life as a whole. "Most of my work centers around an interest in psychology, philosophy and how we process ideas," the artist explained in an email to Hi-Fructose. "I'm also interested in pop culture, the modern existence, and what I see as the poetry of life. I alter my approach depending on how I'm engaging ideas."

Pennsylvania based artist Dorian Vallejo paints the realm of our subconscious as a dreamworld of floating figures, forests and natural motifs. Though his subject matter and style has evolved and shifted between Hyperealism and Surrealism, one element remains the same and that is his interest in feminine beauty, and the beauty of life as a whole. “Most of my work centers around an interest in psychology, philosophy and how we process ideas,” the artist explained in an email to Hi-Fructose. “I’m also interested in pop culture, the modern existence, and what I see as the poetry of life. I alter my approach depending on how I’m engaging ideas.” Among his most striking series depicts beautiful female figures floating in an embryonic bubble of flowing fabric. Oil paintings like “Bubble” and “Sunlight Nude” are rendered in cool blue tones and hot yellows and oranges as a reflection of the different aspects our persona. In more recent works, like “Reflections” and “Bodymind”, Vallejo experiments with less dreamy and more abstract settings, where his subjects’ “fractured” surroundings are intended to represent the concept of contemplation, and how our brain processes information. Take a look at more works from Dorian Vallejo below, with his comments about each piece and series.


“The beautifully simple but complicated structure of a soap bubble, it’s colors sliding against each other, creating intense abstract patterns and the fragility of its existence, led me to draw a comparison, to our physical and mental constructs. This is similar to the birth of new ideas, constantly reshaping and redefining our concept of truth, reality, and self.”


“I also use a dreamworld of floating figures, forests, and natural motifs to suggest the realm of the unconscious and the duality of existence.”


“A part of my intention is toward something symbolic that hints at streams of conscious awareness as we trail off into sleep.”


“In some ways this painting is the precursor to the work I do now. Shown here are special effects, connection to nature and feminine beauty which are elements I still enjoy exploring.”


“A visual exploration on the nature of self reflection; silent but visually cacophonous. The fractured and transparent nature of internal processing.”


“A meditation on the nature of constructed identity and it’s overlapping influences, from tabula rasa to a notion of realized persona.”


“This painting continues along the theme of my previous maze paintings and drawings, engaging and exploring the idea that the labyrinthian recesses of our depths, are of our own making. Likewise, the thread, fragile and seemingly insignificant, is our guide in and out of the passageways.”


“This painting stems from the idea that the complications and challenges we have in life are of our own creation – the labyrinth is one of our own making. The thread, seemingly fragile, is also ours – simultaneously our way in and out.”

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
Eguchi Ayane is a Japanese artist whose oil paintings transport the viewer to candy-colored fantasy lands. Yet within these whimsical worlds, startling scenarios unfold. Juxtaposing 'cutesy' images of teddy bears, bow ties and charming creatures with the darker undercurrent of her narratives, the artist expresses the duality of not only her world, but ours as well. Find more of her work on Twitter.
Megan Buccere, an artist and teacher who lives in Baton Rouge, La., uses soft pastels and oils to tell stories. Her surreal works move between conveying beauty and the unsettling imagery of figures bound in strings or discombobulated. These narratives aren’t always clear, but seem to convey bouts with identity and dialogues between the mind and reality.
American-born Japanese artist Yusk Imai portrays highly stylized figures drawn from his dreams and mythology. Working in his studio in Berlin, Imai creates using a variety of materials and applications including sketches, painting on canvas and wood, photography and large scale wall murals. Often drawing in monochrome, ink on paper is his favorite medium. His images have been compared to Gustav Klimt for their use of intricate patterns and symbolism.
In his debut show at Jonathan LeVine Projects, Lynyrd Paras offers a set of oil paintings that explore the primal and emotional feelings stemming from total bombardment. “Attack of the Wounded Surface" is on view online through Dec. 31. Paras, a Philippines-based artist, has previously seen his work featured in shows throughout Asia.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List