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Vipoo Srivilasa’s Playful Kingdom of Ceramic Figurines

Vipoo Srivilasa works predominantly in ceramics. He uses porcelain clay to hand build his work, then he paints over it with cobalt oxide to obtain the blue color. The last step of this process consists of firing the work at 1200°C. According to the artist, his work is saturated with symbols taken from different religions, although it’s not meant to evoke religion itself, but rather to reinvent certain religious images. "For the series Roop-Rote-Ruang (Taste-Touch-Tell), I used the Buddhist philosophy of Ayatana as a reference for my work. The Roop-Rote-Ruang (Taste-Touch-Tell) Project is a series of dinner parties that I hosted to embrace the Buddhist concept of "Ayatana" and the six “channels of awareness” (my guests’ sight, taste, smell, hearing, touch and mindfulness)”, he says.

Vipoo Srivilasa works predominantly in ceramics. He uses porcelain clay to hand build his work, then he paints over it with cobalt oxide to obtain the blue color. The last step of this process consists of firing the work at 1200°C. According to the artist, his work is saturated with symbols taken from different religions, although it’s not meant to evoke religion itself, but rather to reinvent certain religious images. “For the series Roop-Rote-Ruang (Taste-Touch-Tell), I used the Buddhist philosophy of Ayatana as a reference for my work. The Roop-Rote-Ruang (Taste-Touch-Tell) Project is a series of dinner parties that I hosted to embrace the Buddhist concept of “Ayatana” and the six “channels of awareness” (my guests’ sight, taste, smell, hearing, touch and mindfulness)”, he says.

Srivilasa’s work also explores the commonalities between Thai and Australian culture and Eastern and Western culture, where he uses blue and white as a reference to the export of blue and white porcelain from China to Europe. While being fully aware of his heritage, Srivilasa has been mixing up echoes from the past with traces of the present in a carefully arranged juxtaposition of old and new ways of thinking. One of the key technical differences between the traditional style he takes inspiration from and his modern interpretation of it is the surface texture of the work. Furthermore, traditional blue and white porcelain has a clear glaze applied over it, while in Srivilasa’s work, there’s no need for such an expedient since he developed a specific blue color formula to skip glazing.

Vipoo Srivilasa’s work will be on display at the Adler Subhashok Gallery of Bangkok from April 2nd through 30th, 2016.

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