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Dosshaus Builds Their Dream House Made Entirely out of Cardboard

Nothing beat a cardboard box growing up because it wasn't just made of cardboard. Cardboard could instantly become your ticket to a rocket on the moon or your dream fortress where you ruled the world. Using this simple material and a lot of imagination, artist duo Zoey Taylor and David Connelly have built the world they wish to live in. They call it "The House of Cardboard", better known as "Dosshaus". The two (or as they say, "Les Deux") first met in 2010 and it was a match made in heaven that works together as a team, cutting and gluing together the cardboard pieces into life size installations, which feature the creative couple living in a monochromatic black and white house.

Nothing beat a cardboard box growing up because it wasn’t just made of cardboard. Cardboard could instantly become your ticket to a rocket on the moon or your dream fortress where you ruled the world. Using this simple material and a lot of imagination, artist duo Zoey Taylor and David Connelly have built the world they wish to live in. They call it “The House of Cardboard”, better known as “Dosshaus”. The two (or as they say, “Les Deux”) first met in 2010 and it was a match made in heaven that works together as a team, cutting and gluing together the cardboard pieces into life size installations, which feature the creative couple living in a monochromatic black and white house. Everything from their “Sunday Lunch”, to the tennis rackets and chess pieces in “The Sporting Room” to real, working music records (that you can listen to on Dosshaus’ Vimeo channel) in “The Music Room” are made entirely out of cardboard, including the clothing that they wear in the photos. The Dosshaus feels like a magical place, but its name has roots in poorhouse establishments, called “dosshouses”, that were prevalent in the 19 century. Taylor and Connelly bring some joy back into them with their fascinating, cheerfully retro and elaborate universe, and like any good home, it is a never-ending work in progress. Dosshaus are now in production of their first feature-length film.

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