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Rogan Brown’s Latest Series of Intricate Cut Paper Sculptures

"I am inspired by the incredible variety and complexity of the natural world that surrounds me," says Southern France based artist Rogan Brown. Brown's winter wonderland of intricately cut paper sculptures first caught our attention in 2013, when we featured his abstract formations of florals and pathogens, hand-cut out of watercolor paper with exquisite precision. His latest series, created throughout 2015, combines the techniques of hand paper cutting and laser cutting, leaving the burnt edges of the paper for added texture and depth to his already complex works of art.

“I am inspired by the incredible variety and complexity of the natural world that surrounds me,” says Southern France based artist Rogan Brown. Brown’s winter wonderland of intricately cut paper sculptures first caught our attention in 2013, when we featured his abstract formations of florals and pathogens, hand-cut out of watercolor paper with exquisite precision. His latest series, created throughout 2015, combines the techniques of hand paper cutting and laser cutting, leaving the burnt edges of the paper for added texture and depth to his already complex works of art. The slow and delicate process of cutting can sometimes take him months to complete a single piece. These new works make multiple references to organisms like coral, bacteria, and diatoms, which Brown describes as half real and half surreal. “Each motif is completely fictive and imagined; it is this interplay between the imagination and the “real” world that fascinates me, reality is transformed and estranged through the creative process which paradoxically makes the finished work more real and unique.” Take a look at some of Brown’s new work below.

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