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Carlo Cane’s Latest Series of Lush and Dreamy Landscapes

Carlo Cane's misty landscapes appear as if in a beautiful dream, but through the thick fog exists something sinister and unappealing. The Italian artist, featured here on our blog, is distraught about how we are treating our environment and the implications of our growing disconnection to nature. But rather than focus on images of loss, he expresses his concern by presenting us with bewildering and surreal portrayals of nature in its most vigorous and alluring state. Cane recently shared his new paintings in an email to Hi-Fructose, in which he explores the possibilities of our future, while taking a note from our past.

Carlo Cane’s misty landscapes appear as if in a beautiful dream, but through the thick fog exists something sinister and unappealing. The Italian artist, featured here on our blog, is distraught about how we are treating our environment and the implications of our growing disconnection to nature. But rather than focus on images of loss, he expresses his concern by presenting us with bewildering and surreal portrayals of nature in its most vigorous and alluring state. Cane recently shared his new paintings in an email to Hi-Fructose, in which he explores the possibilities of our future, while taking a note from our past. “Man, arrogant and selfish, is shaping this planet for the purposes of his own needs. In order to live in harmony with our planet, we must regain an equilibrium with nature and rediscover the slow flowing of seasons. My latest works, like “A Possible World”, are becoming more inspired by Renaissance era stylings of nature,” he shares. In soft washes, his images evoke nostalgia for a paradise lost, a lush and thriving world inhabited by lizards, snails and an abundance of green moss and foliage. Between dewy, translucent leaves, one can just barely make out the ghost of human civilization as a silhouette of houses, gradually vanishing but not yet absent from this world.

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