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Jan Kaláb aka “Point” Translates His Graffiti Writing into Geometric Spheres

You may know Czech artist Jan Kaláb, aka "POINT" (used for his sculptures), aka "Cakes" (used for his traditional graffiti), and the founder of street art crew the "DSK". He is credited as one of the first artists to bring urban art into Eastern European countries after the borders opened up in the early 90s. Kaláb's work has seen an evolution since his abstract graffiti writing, where in recent years, he has translated his street art style onto canvas and hand-painted geometric sculptures.

You may know Czech artist Jan Kaláb, aka “POINT” (used for his sculptures), aka “Cakes” (used for his traditional graffiti), and the founder of street art crew the “DSK”. He is credited as one of the first artists to bring urban art into Eastern European countries after the borders opened up in the early 90s. Kaláb’s work has seen an evolution since his abstract graffiti writing, where in recent years, he has translated his street art style onto canvas and hand-painted geometric sculptures. He refers to his sculptures as “3D Graffiti”, infinite spheres that break the two-dimensional surface of his paintings. Exhibited together, his paintings and sculptures illustrate an abstract world of forms and the relationship between those forms. Kaláb is currently showing a new series of eight paintings and a sculpture in his solo exhibition, “TENSION” at BC Gallery in Berlin, Germany. Here, the planet Earth is presented as a sphere itself, which has been constantly shifting and changing its surface since the beginning of time. The exhibit is an extension of the artist’s overall narrative about the relationship between this naturally occurring tension and that which occurs in our daily lives. “TENSION” by Jan Kaláb is now on view at BC Gallery through January 23rd, 2016.

“TENSION”:

Additional works:

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