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Laurie Lipton Draws a World Overtaken by Technology in “Techno Rococo”

In Laurie Lipton's recent works, featured here, the artist take us into a world that feels overwhelmed with technology. It is a place where wires, screens, emojis and other aspects of our modern day communication devices define this world's movement and style. She calls it a "Techno Rococo" of sorts, the title and basis of her latest series of drawings which debuted over the weekend at Ace Gallery in Los Angeles.


“Selfie”

In Laurie Lipton’s recent works, featured here, the artist take us into a world that feels overwhelmed with technology. It is a place where wires, screens, emojis and other aspects of our modern day communication devices define this world’s movement and style. She calls it a “Techno Rococo” of sorts, the title and basis of her latest series of drawings which debuted over the weekend at Ace Gallery in Los Angeles. When we last caught up with her, she was tucked away into her Hollywood studio working on the series, where she shared with us her inspiration behind some of the pieces: “I am currently exploring society’s relationship to technology and how it’s uniting us while simultaneously disconnecting everyone from each other. I am also being driven crazy by wires, in my home and in my work,” she explained. Lipton uses a single graphite pencil to create her massive, near photo-realistic drawings that feature subtle gradations of light and intricate details. If you feel yourself getting lost in some of her work, the feeling is mutual, as each piece begins with a thought or narrative that expands once Lipton’s pencil touches the paper. “This work is not decorative. These are not facile forms that can be quickly glanced at,” she adds. “Techno Rococo” is comprised of a series of seventeen of Lipton’s recent drawings and now on view at Ace Gallery through March 2016.


“Selfie”, detail


“Virtual Reality”


“Virtual Reality”, detail, in progress


“LOL”


“Off”, 8×6′ ft


“Happy”, 6×9′ ft


“Happy” detail


“Illusion of Control Tower”, 4×12′ ft

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