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Roberto Ferri’s Baroque-Inspired Paintings Delve into the Human Soul

Roberto Ferri is known for his poetic imagery imbued with references to Baroque painters such as Caravaggio and other old masters of Romanticism. His work focuses on the coexistence of good and evil, sacred and profane in both our daily life and our subconscious. In this light, the emotional intensity of his depictions reveals an attempt to connect the parallel dimension, where his almost-theatrical representations take place in a socio-psychological present. The psychological aspects of his figures are projections of different phases that the human soul goes through during its ongoing transformation.

Roberto Ferri is known for his poetic imagery imbued with references to Baroque painters such as Caravaggio and other old masters of Romanticism. His work focuses on the coexistence of good and evil, sacred and profane in both our daily life and our subconscious. In this light, the emotional intensity of his depictions reveals an attempt to connect the parallel dimension, where his almost-theatrical representations take place in a socio-psychological present. The psychological aspects of his figures are projections of different phases that the human soul goes through during its ongoing transformation. The subjects of his paintings are isolated from the distractions of the outside world- completely absorbed in a metaphysical vortex of their own feelings. As the artist further explains: “Each of my paintings carries a message containing symbols and allegories whose interpretation depends on the viewers: the message travels in two opposite directions concerning both intellectual tension and perception.” Ferri has just landed in Miami for the third time to participate in Context Miami 2015 with the Liquid Art System Gallery of Capri and Positano. For this year’s edition, Liquid Art System will showcase the work “Il Bacio” (The Kiss), for which the artist took inspiration from “Eternal Springtime”, a sculpture created by Auguste Rodin, to portray the awakening sensuality of two young lovers. Take a look at more works from Roberto Ferri below.

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