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The New Contemporary Art Magazine

D*Face’s “Catrina” Mural Honors Day of the Dead in Mexico City

London based street artist D*Face recently paid his first ever visit to Mexico to participate in the Dual Year UKMX 2015. The event is a multi faceted program designed to bring more cultural, academic, and commercial projects from the United Kingdom to Mexico. At the same time, Mexico promotes culture, innovation and Mexican commerce in various cities throughout the United Kingdom. D*Face's large scale mural for the project, titled "Catrina", takes up the length of an entire building in the Roma neighborhood. His depiction of a highly glamorized, deathly feminine character combines his macabre pop portraits with traditional Mexican elements.

London based street artist D*Face recently paid his first ever visit to Mexico to participate in the Dual Year UKMX 2015. The event is a multi faceted program designed to bring more cultural, academic, and commercial projects from the United Kingdom to Mexico. At the same time, Mexico promotes culture, innovation and Mexican commerce in various cities throughout the United Kingdom. D*Face’s large scale mural for the project, titled “Catrina”, takes up the length of an entire building in the Roma neighborhood. His depiction of a highly glamorized, deathly feminine character combines his macabre pop portraits with traditional Mexican elements. As an homage to the Day of the Dead celebrations, she is wearing an elegant floral headpiece and skeletal makeup, with an expression reminiscent of Roy Lichtenstein’s Crying Girl. D*Face’s “de-faced” portraits convey his fascination with celebrity, fame, consumerism, death and immortality. The artist hopes such imagery will encourage us to look more closely at what surrounds us in our lives and reconsider our cultural figures, while commenting on our consumption of them.

D*Face’s “Catrina”, made in collaboration with British Council Mexico, is located in Av. Cuauhtémoc 273 in the Roma neighborhood of Mexico City.

All photos by Francisco Betanzos.

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