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Zachari Logan’s “Grotesques” and Alessandra Maria’s “Di Minores”

Alessandra Maria and Zachari Logan's works offer poetic and detailed portrayals of figures mixed with nature, but in different ways. The two artists will debut their new series in side by side exhibitions tomorrow at Roq la Rue gallery in Seattle. While Logan's distorts the male figure in a sensual way, Maria's enhances the divine qualities of feminine allure. For his latest series, titled "Grotesques", Logan transforms figures based on his own into a landscape of lush flora and fauna. Using a subdued palette, his paintings weave together figures out of petals, branches and animals to the effect of a Medieval tapestry. Though elegant, his hybrid subjects embody the concept of grotesqueness in their disfigurement or "re-wilding", as he calls it.

Alessandra Maria and Zachari Logan’s works offer poetic and detailed portrayals of figures mixed with nature, but in different ways. The two artists will debut their new series in side by side exhibitions tomorrow at Roq la Rue gallery in Seattle. While Logan’s distorts the male figure in a sensual way, Maria’s enhances the divine qualities of feminine allure. For his latest series, titled “Grotesques”, Logan transforms figures based on his own into a landscape of lush flora and fauna. Using a subdued palette, his paintings weave together figures out of petals, branches and animals to the effect of a Medieval tapestry. Though elegant, his hybrid subjects embody the concept of grotesqueness in their disfigurement or “re-wilding”, as he calls it. Alessandra Maria’s work often depicts long-haired, somewhat melancholy figures adorned with gold leaf-laden elements. She found inspiration in the deities of Abrahamic religions for her series “Di Minores”. Her works present portraits of an alternative holy trinity- reiterations of the virgin, matron, and courtesan figures. To Maria, they are the epitome of beauty and femininity, adorned with her signature motifs of golden flowers and butterflies. Take a look at more works from Zachari Logan’s “Grotesques” and Alessandra Maria’s “Di Minores” below.

Zachari Logan:

Alessandra Maria:

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