Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Matt Dangler’s “Sanctify” and Mark Garro’s “Corpus Callosum”

The impossibilities that magic and fantasy can create are at the heart of Matt Dangler and Mark Garro's side by side solos at Copro Gallery in Los Angeles. Both artists are known for their depictions of creatures and figures of legend in scenes evoking a certain darkness. In recent exhibitions, covered here, Matt Dangler has looked to Old Master painting techniques by artists like Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, and Johannes Vermeer, marked by their serene mood and luminous colors of painting. For his exhibition, "Sanctify", Dangler takes a note from the religious themes found in Renaissance art in particular, where figures like Jesus and the Hindu God Ganesh appear in bizarre settings.

The impossibilities that magic and fantasy can create are at the heart of Matt Dangler and Mark Garro‘s side by side solos at Copro Gallery in Los Angeles. Both artists are known for their depictions of creatures and figures of legend in scenes evoking a certain darkness. In recent exhibitions, covered here, Matt Dangler has looked to Old Master painting techniques by artists like Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, and Johannes Vermeer, marked by their serene mood and luminous colors of painting. For his exhibition, “Sanctify”, Dangler takes a note from the religious themes found in Renaissance art in particular, where figures like Jesus and the Hindu God Ganesh appear in bizarre settings. Several images reimagine the Law of Moses in the Hebrew Bible, where a robed mutant carries a lantern that never burns out, a symbol of never-ceasing worship.


“The Promised Land” by Matt Dangler

Mark Garro, covered here, also injects whimsy into his new series, titled “Corpus Callosum.” His title refers to the connection of the two halves of the brain, a theme he follows in the composition of his paintings. Garro’s paintings often explore an alternate universe, represented here in wonderous underwater scenes. One piece illustrates a scene from Moby Dick, revealed to be a gigantic whale-tailed mermaid swimming underneath Captain Ahab’s warring ship. By splitting the scenery in two, Garro depicts subjects that are not exactly what they seem to be. While his subjects find peace and tranquility under the water’s surface, this is a stark contrast to the aggression and horrors that exist in the real world above.

Matt Dangler’s “Sanctify” and Mark Garro’s “Corpus Callosum” exhibitions are now on view at Copro Gallery in Los Angeles through October 31st, 2015.

Matt Dangler:

Mark Garro:

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
San Francisco based artist Casey Cripe describes himself as an "artist-scientist", and his multimedia works as maps of the infinite landscapes of self, life, and the universe. The title of his current exhibition "One is All is One" at Mirus Gallery in San Francisco centers around a universal concept: while the world is big and vast, little things like people and animals are what keep it going. With death, comes life, and when we die, the world continues on and moves forward in this continuous cycle.
Russian artist Dimitry Vorsin creates beguiling surrealist worlds populated with mystifying and erotic characters. Drawing influence from Salvador Dali, his figures are often elongated and with decapitated limbs. For example, one arm of a woman in a running pose morphs into what appears as a rat’s tail. The other is shown in a puppet-like construction, controlled by small nymphs wearing tall spiraling headwraps that match the woman’s own grandiose headware. The sexually fraught image suggests the power of the psyche to serve as a symbolic whip.
Belgium based figurative painter Michal Lukasiewicz portrays his subjects with the tenderness and warm sensuality of the High Renaissance, combined with the vibrancy of Pop art in his use of bright colors. Working primarily in acrylic, his works are almost monochrome, if not for the patches of shades like off-white, ochre, sienna, pink, grays, and neon oranges and yellows. Despite the contemporary expressiveness of his palette, his nude subjects, mostly women, have a mysteriously quiet nature about them that recalls famous figures in art like Leonardo's "Mona Lisa", or Vermeer's "Girl with a Pearl Earring".
Coinciding with the opening of "BLAB!" at Copro Gallery last Saturday was Yoko d'Holbachie's "Genesis of Girls". Over the course of her career, featured in Vol. 6 in 2007, d'Holbachie has created candy colored paintings inspired by the stories of time. One of her greatest inspirations is traditional Japanese folklore and legends. Her characters are non-human and androgynous with a feminine touch, found in her symbols of butterflies and birds representing fertility. Her latest solo show is a reimagining and exploration of the origin of girls from various cultures.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List