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Moonassi’s Life-long Series of Black and White Drawings

Seoul, South Korea based artist Daehuyn Kim, aka "Moonassi", started his black and white drawing series in 2008 and has no intentions of stopping. Moonassi's "life-time project", he calls it, reads like a diary. "Each drawing is created based on my daily thoughts and feelings. I draw to meditate on myself and others, to be able to see the whole story of the series in the end," he says.

Seoul, South Korea based artist Daehuyn Kim, aka “Moonassi”, started his black and white drawing series in 2008 and has no intentions of stopping. Moonassi’s “life-time project”, he calls it, reads like a diary. “Each drawing is created based on my daily thoughts and feelings. I draw to meditate on myself and others, to be able to see the whole story of the series in the end,” he says. The name “Moonassi” roughly translates as “there is no such thing as me”, referring to a certain emptiness or void, as in someone with no identity. Exploring identity, or at least his own, is a recurring theme throughout Moonassi’s drawings and other works which span woodblock printing, sculpture and new media. Every drawing represents an emotion or a word that Moonassi chooses to express through simple characters. They are practically identical with no clear gender or race, differentiated only by their gestures and zen-like situations. In his piece “Sometimes, I’m so tangible”, Moonassi illustrates the concept of tangibility. It’s a big word that he captures beautifully in its most basic form- a character’s tears disintegrate into his body, where his existence transcends beyond the normal, tangible level. Today, we live in a loud world where people tweet and post and share their every thought carelessly. Moonassi’s drawings make us take a step back and consider the weight that a single thought can carry.

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