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Todd James Paints a Wacky Domestic Life in “Fly Like the Wind”

Originating from the New York graffiti scene, where he was known as "REAS", artist Todd James (covered here) has become instantly recognizable for his colorful abstract style and erotic sense of humor. You may also know him as the artist who designed logos for the Beastie Boys, or Miley Cyrus' outlandish backup bear dancers. Some have compared James' creative style to a child's for his use of cartoony lines and forms, which he combines with adult subjects. He has described his art as a sort of "horrible cartoon", influenced by UPA (United Productions of America) animations. His latest solo exhibition "Fly Like the Wind" recently opened on Saturday at Nanzuka Underground gallery in Tokyo.

Originating from the New York graffiti scene, where he was known as “REAS”, artist Todd James (covered here) has become instantly recognizable for his colorful abstract style and erotic sense of humor. You may also know him as the artist who designed logos for the Beastie Boys, or Miley Cyrus’ outlandish backup bear dancers. Some have compared James’ creative style to a child’s for his use of cartoony lines and forms, which he combines with adult subjects. He has described his art as a sort of “horrible cartoon”, influenced by UPA (United Productions of America) animations. His latest solo exhibition “Fly Like the Wind” recently opened on Saturday at Nanzuka Underground gallery in Tokyo. Everywhere, we find eccentric motifs based on the familiar and everyday; dining room table sets and houseplants, sunburnt, naked women lounging in their homes, or cooking and watching television, to utterly bizarre characters like googly-eyed warplanes and the “Tit Wizard” (recreated as James’ first plush doll.) James often sources his images from television and newspapers, which he reinterprets with a tongue in cheek criticism of contemporary society.  Where his previous showings focused on more political issues, here, James formulates his worldview from behind closed doors and through the filter of domestic life. Take a look at more works from the show below, courtesy of the gallery.

Todd James’ “Fly Like The Wind” is now on view at Nanzuka Underground gallery in Tokyo, Japan through November 14th, 2015.

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