Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Kim Simonsson’s Latest Series Reimagines Nordic “Moss People”

Kim Simonsson's ceramic sculptures of strange children and their forest animal friends are like something out of a Nordic fairytale. Some of them have long ears giving them a fairy-like appearance, with empty eyes that make us wonder what lies underneath their ceramic "shell". Previously featured on our blog, their strangeness is in part due to Simonsson's combination of influences from Western and Eastern pop culture. Opening on October 8th, Simonsson will reveal his latest series at Jason Jacques Gallery in New York.

Kim Simonsson’s ceramic sculptures of strange children and their forest animal friends are like something out of a Nordic fairytale. Some of them have long ears giving them a fairy-like appearance, with empty eyes that make us wonder what lies underneath their ceramic “shell”. Previously featured on our blog, their strangeness is in part due to Simonsson’s combination of influences from Western and Eastern pop culture. Opening on October 8th, Simonsson will reveal his latest series at Jason Jacques Gallery in New York. Titled “Moss People,” most figures are colored a monochromatic green with clumps of growth, as if covered in moss. In Norse mythology, “moss people” are fairy or forest folk, specifically elven girls who lived in moss affected areas. According to legend, they would occasionally borrow items from people and steal little human children, leaving a changeling in their place. Swapped children is common in medieval literature and reflects concern over infants thought to be afflicted with unexplained diseases or other disabilities. Although they appear sweet, tending to young fawns and bunnies, Simonsson instills a darkness within their hard exterior: his self-described “unsightly” works examine the diseases of modern society. This connects with Simonsson’s overall theme, where his characters relate to the artist’s comments on daily life and its oddities.

Kim Simonsson’s “Moss People” will be on view at Jason Jacques Gallery in New York from October 8 through 28th, 2015.

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
For years, Raúl de Nieves has blurred lines between fine art and fashion design, positioning himself as an inspiration for the likes of Vogue and Lady Gaga. He is perhaps best known for his beaded shoe-sculptures, crafted in a rainbow spectrum matched by his figurative painting. De Nieves makes his debut in Los Angeles tomorrow with "I'm in A Story", at MUSEUM as RETAIL SPACE (MaRS). Inspired by his native Mexican folklore, Catholic symbolism and fairytales, the exhibition loosely adapts two stories; Colin Self's chamber opera The Fool (which starred the artist) and the episode of Saint George and the Dragon.
Pittsburgh based artist David Burton's striking assemblages are made out of vintage toys and other found objects as he happens upon them, layered into puzzle-like creations. His near-obsessive layering of objects recalls the work of other assemblage artists, like Kris Kuksi, infused with a sense of playfulness despite their dark color. Sourced everywhere from local thrift shops to his walks on the beach, the objects that Burton features are also his main source of inspiration.
Japanese artist Shintaro Ohata places sculptures in front of paintings to create wondrous scenes inspired by childhood. They play out every day encounters between his child subjects, their pets and imaginary friends with the world around them. While their lives may seem ordinary for the most part, Ohata's playful and impressionistic style make them feel like fantasies. They are sculpted from polystyrene which are then painted to perfectly match their traditional 2D acrylic backgrounds.
In Buddhism, the concept of Samsara is the repeating cycle of birth, life and death or reincarnation as well as one's actions and consequences in the past, present, and future. Japanese artist Isana Yamada chose to embody this idea in his surreal series of translucent whale sculptures for his post-graduation project at the Tokyo University of the Arts. It is a project that ties into Yamada's overall concept of Tsukumogami in his artwork, referring to the traditional belief that long-lived animals possess spirits and gods by the transience of time. At his website for the project, he shares, "The title of the piece is "Samsara", which is a Buddhist term for "cycle of existence". In this work, six whales are swimming in a circle; these represent the six stages of Samsara. Inside each whale encapsulates various objects, such as submarine volcano, sailboat, and a sea of clouds."

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List