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Joe Iurato Builds an Endearing Miniature World with Woodcuts

Look down. Hiding between sidewalk cracks and under train tracks, you just might find one of the people who inhabit Joe Iurato's miniature world. The New York-based artist cuts people from wood and photographs them in active positions within cities and landscapes. The resulting photographs are endearing miniature reflections of the world. By placing his cutouts in familiar settings, Iurato draws attention to the details in our greater environment. Furthermore, by painting the works in black-and-white, the artist creates a sense of nostalgia, especially around his portraits of men walking along train tracks.

Look down. Hiding between sidewalk cracks and under train tracks, you just might find one of the people who inhabit Joe Iurato’s miniature world. The New York-based artist cuts people from wood and photographs them in active positions within cities and landscapes. The resulting photographs are endearing miniature reflections of the world. By placing his cutouts in familiar settings, Iurato draws attention to the details in our greater environment. Furthermore, by painting the works in black-and-white, the artist creates a sense of nostalgia, especially around his portraits of men walking along train tracks.

But perhaps Iurato’s most enchanting works are those involving children and teenagers who fly toy airplanes, look at the world through telescopes and climb trees. They offer glimpses of hope and desire in the bigger world of chaos and darkness.

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