Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Barnaby Barford’s “Tower of Babel” Made of 3,000 Miniature Buildings

First featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 8, and soon, our exhibition with Virgina MOCA in 2016, Barnaby Barford builds vignettes and installations out of found figurines that he cuts up and reassembles. The objects he uses for his materials are some that most people would dismiss in their original form, but Barford's art makes them relevant and alluring. For his latest installation, "Tower of Babel", the artist's process began when he cycled over 1,000 miles to photograph facades from each of London's postcodes.

First featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 8, and soon, our exhibition with Virgina MOCA in 2016, Barnaby Barford builds vignettes and installations out of found figurines that he cuts up and reassembles. The objects he uses for his materials are some that most people would dismiss in their original form, but Barford’s art makes them relevant and alluring. For his latest installation, “Tower of Babel”, the artist’s process began when he cycled over 1,000 miles to photograph facades from each of London’s postcodes. Specifically, what caught his eye were shops in the city of Stroke-on-Trent in England. 3,000 miniature bone-china replicas of those buildings make up his piece, modeled after the biblical Towel of Babel and created for the the Victoria and Albert Museum where it is currently on display. The tower is so extensive, in fact, that the museum has dedicated a daily blog to it, highlighting the individual pieces that went into creating it. At its base are neglected shops, culminating to London’s exclusive boutiques and galleries at its highest point. Standing at a massive 20 feet high, the tower is meant to be a representation of London today and a monument to commerce. Barford says, “This is London in all its retail glory, our city in the beginning of the 21st century and I’m asking, how does it make you feel?”

Barnaby Barford’s “Tower of Babel is currently on display at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London through November 1st.

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
Recently, the Captain Boomer Collective delivered an unexpected object just steps away from the Notre-Dame Cathedral in Paris: a beached whale. Well, it’s actually a fiberglass statue, though anyone approaching the accompanying “scientists,” life-like stench, and mass of the creature is in for an experience much like the real-life occurrence. The point is to offer both mystery and hint at the real-world problems of humans’ destruction of natural ecosystems.
Over the years, we've featured many artists whose works count light as their material of choice, from Kumi Yamashita's origami inspired shadow art pieces, Anila Quayyum's intricate installations, and David Begbie’s steel mesh sculptures- and today we add German artist Moto Waganari to that list. Waganari's (whose real name is Lutz Wagner) filigree polygon sculptures are already compelling, but when you shine a bright light on them from the right angle, they cast spirited and dramatic shadows that bring them to life.
First featured in H-Fructose Vol. 12, Korean artist Jin Young Yu makes haunting sculptures with a mystifying use of transparency. She achieves the invisibility of her doll-like figures through a highly transparent plastic. Yu's deeply intimate works reflect on her emotional experience of adolescence, and more recently, mirror her adult personality. Opening on September 19th, she will make her US solo debut at Art Merge Lab in Los Angeles.
The surreal sculptures of Samuel Salcedo add both distortion and vulnerability to the human form. The Spanish artist plays with texture and scale, creating intimacy in both nude figures and massive faces adorning gallery walls. Most of the pieces carry humor: All of them are packed with bare humanity.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List