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Amazing Digitally Rendered Organisms by Six & Five

What makes some of us feel repulsed may be a thing of a beauty to others. That seems to be the case with Buenos Aires based studio and artist collective Six & Five's latest work. The group has designed a beautifully disturbing series of digital creatures that they call "Morbo". Inspired by oceanic organisms, the Morbo are all that remain of a recently-occurred apocalypse, discovered on toxic beaches during low tide. They are strangely alluring in their hyperrealism.

What makes some of us feel repulsed may be a thing of a beauty to others. That seems to be the case with Buenos Aires based studio and artist collective Six & Five’s latest work. The group has designed a beautifully disturbing series of digital creatures that they call “Morbo”. Inspired by oceanic organisms, the Morbo are all that remain of a recently-occurred apocalypse, discovered on toxic beaches during low tide. They are strangely alluring in their hyperrealism. Designers Andy Reisinger and Ezequiel Pini admit, “We realized that it generated a lot of confusion in the viewer, as some thought they were photographs of actual items… others believed that they were hyperrealistic paintings.” The Morbo are created out of white clay using a 3D modeling process, lit, photographed, and then digitally assigned various textures and materials. The result is an image of a strange object made of fragments that look unbelievably natural, but are entirely digital.

Before digital application:

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