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The Best Public Art and Murals of Norway’s Nuart Festival 2015

For fifteen years, the first week of September in Norway has been reserved for Nuart festival. This year's opened on September 3rd with a large group show titled "OutsidersIN". The show features works by past, present and future Nuart artists, which includes leading names in the urban art movement. Built around the idea of 'situationism', DIY-culture and play, Nuart hosted debates, seminars, lectures, movie projections and on-site creation of artwork. Representing different techniques and subjects, this year's lineup works with both traditional and unconventional mediums like trash, cement, and posters.


Bordalo II

For fifteen years, the first week of September in Norway has been reserved for Nuart festival. This year’s opened on September 3rd with a large group show titled “OutsidersIN”. The show features works by past, present and future Nuart artists, which includes leading names in the urban art movement. Built around the idea of ‘situationism’, DIY-culture and play, Nuart hosted debates, seminars, lectures, movie projections and on-site creation of artwork. Representing different techniques and subjects, this year’s lineup works with both traditional and unconventional mediums like trash, cement, and posters.


Ella & Pitr

Some of the first finished public pieces are Ella & Pitr’s record breaking mural (recently covered here) on top of a Block Berge Bygg’s facility in Klepp. After finishing their gigantic rooftop piece, the duo completed two more pieces in town, as well as some secret projects left for people to discover. Spanish street artist Pejac painted a clever tribute to Norwegian painter Edvard Munch sing toy car wheels as a brush. Portuguese artist Bordalo II spent few days creating a new piece from his “Big Trash Animals” series in which he creates portraits of animals using materials responsible for the destruction of their habitat. Spanish artist Isaac Cordal spent his days in Stavanger, installing over fifty sculptures of small, sad, miserable business people, looking at the world beneath them. Lithuanian Ernest Zacharevic, a returning artist, used his time to create two distinctive pieces – a cross stitched image of a traditional Norwegian wooden house on fire, and an emotional vision of local landmark statue of children’s book characters, Johanna and Broremann. Along with these works, the town hosted the inauguration of Sandra Chevrier‘s first mural for the Aftenblad Wall project. Take a look at more photos from the first part of this massive event below.

All photos by Sasha Bogojev.


The Outings Project


The Outings Project


The Outings Project


Sandra Chevrier


Sandra Chevrier


Pejac


Pejac


Martin Whatson


Martin Whatson


Icy Sot


Ernest Zacharevic


Ernest Zacharevic


Ernest Zacharevic


Ella & Pitr

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