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Bon Appetit! Melis Buyruk Serves Porcelain Hearts

Think twice when accepting a dinner invention from Melis Buyruk. The Turkish artist's sleek, white porcelain is elegant and expertly crafted. However, you won't find vases and figurines in Buyruk's studio. Instead, clean white dishes are plated with life-like hands, hearts and ears. To accent the pure forms, Buyruk adds minute golden flies.

Think twice when accepting a dinner invention from Melis Buyruk. The Turkish artist’s sleek, white porcelain is elegant and expertly crafted. However, you won’t find vases and figurines in Buyruk’s studio. Instead, clean white dishes are plated with life-like hands, hearts and ears. To accent the pure forms, Buyruk adds minute golden flies. Though the scene may be one out of American Horror Story, the dishes are gorgeous sculptural objects with a sensuous touch. Served erogenous zones such as belly buttons and lips invigorate the porcelain, suggesting the human body, and love, can be consumed and even devoured.

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