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José Luis Torres Builds Explosive Installation Out of Plastic Objects

José Luis Torres is an Argentinean artist currently living in Quebec who builds largescale works out of salvaged objects. He's set up public art installations and sculptures all over the world, using everything from antique doors, window panes, to assemblages of brightly colored plastic as his materials. Often, his works have an overflowing effect as they burst from existing environments and architectural structures. His latest work entitled "Overflows" is a part of the 2015 Passages Insolites (Unusual Passages) event in Quebec City’s Old Port.

José Luis Torres is an Argentinean artist currently living in Quebec who builds largescale works out of salvaged objects. He’s set up public art installations and sculptures all over the world, using everything from antique doors, window panes, to assemblages of brightly colored plastic as his materials. Often, his works have an overflowing effect as they burst from existing environments and architectural structures. His latest work entitled “Overflows” is a part of the 2015 Passages Insolites (Unusual Passages) event in Quebec City’s Old Port. The towering piece is made up of plastic objects like kayaks, buckets and trash bins, and appears to explode out of the shipping containers that support it. While playful in its application, Torres’ installation is intended to question our relation to the world, specifically our over-consumption of plastic. Take a look at more images of “Overlows”, and additional works, by José Luis Torres below.

“Overflows”:

Additional works:

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