Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Crystal Wagner Builds Colorful Crepe-paper Playscape in Singapore

Philadelphia based artist Crystal Wagner recently exhibited a colorful new installation at the National Museum of Singapore. "Wanderlust" is a site-specific piece that she created for the museum's "Masak Masak 2015" exhibition, a part of their 'season of the children' celebrations. Previously covered here on our blog, Wagner's largescale works are attention grabbing for her choice of curious and unconventional materials including paper, chicken wire, and tablecloths. Measuring a massive 70 feet long, her new piece is made out of pliable materials such as crepe paper and wire, from which she shaped tunnels for children to play in and crawl through.

Philadelphia based artist Crystal Wagner recently exhibited a colorful new installation at the National Museum of Singapore. “Wanderlust” is a site-specific piece that she created for the museum’s “Masak Masak 2015” exhibition, a part of their ‘season of the children’ celebrations. Previously covered here on our blog, Wagner’s largescale works are attention grabbing for her choice of curious and unconventional materials including paper, chicken wire, and tablecloths. Measuring a massive 70 feet long, her new piece is made out of pliable materials such as crepe paper and wire, from which she shaped tunnels for children to play in and crawl through. The title of the piece refers to their strong desire to wander and explore, and here, Wagner offers them an enchanting playscape for them to discover. At her website, she shares a simple wish for those who encounter it: “be actively curious about the world you live in”. Take a look at photos of “Wanderlust” below, courtesy of the artist.

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
Using grid-like patterns that snake and spiral into organic shapes, Peter Kogler creates installations that make viewers feel like they just entered the matrix. Sometimes painted directly on the walls and sometimes in the form of projections, Kogler's futuristic aesthetic transforms spaces into illusory environments with a disorienting effect. The artist has created his installations on the walls of galleries and museums all over Europe. In the photos documenting his pieces below, viewers become subsumed in patterns as they navigate Kogler's altered spaces.
Diana Al-Hadid’s ghostly sculptures, which take influence from historical architecture, mythology, and beyond, are currently inhabiting both a gallery at Frist Art Museum and outdoor gardens at Cheekwood in concurrent exhibitions in Nashville. “Subliminations” collects varying types of work from the artist, with both figurative sculpture and wall reliefs. Above and below interior photos are by John Schweikert.
Jo Cope, a conceptual fashion designer, mixes fine art and fashion. The artist intends to create pieces that are “hybrid installations that are perhaps only possible in a gallery but that nonetheless create a wearable garment and suggest alternative futures for fashion design.” Due to this blending of fields, her work has appeared in design stores, boutiques, and galleries across the world.
Little is known about Japanese artist trio three. The young, anonymous artist collective utilizes toys and other childhood ephemera to create provocative installations and sculptures. Action figures and rubber figurines are melted into fleshy masses. The artists create complex, geometric forms out of the liquified toys, forming them into patters that alternate distinguishable characters' faces and anonymous, tan blobs where limbs and bodies used to be. Micro elements accumulate into overwhelming conglomerations that challenge the viewer's eye to distinguish their many details.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List