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Digital Artist Tatiana Plakhova Draws Complex and Futuristic Worlds

Moscow, Russia based artist Tatiana Plakhova is fascinated by universal concepts which are at the core of her futuristic works. Her approach is purely analytical, designing luminous landscapes using precise geometric lines. Created entirely in Adobe Illustrator, she calls these "infographic drawings", reflecting on how we collect information about the world around us. In her statement, Plakhova writes, "This mathematical style helps me to illustrate everything from biological cell to the space and meditative worlds. That’s why I admire math, because it’s everywhere and nowhere."

Moscow, Russia based artist Tatiana Plakhova is fascinated by universal concepts which are at the core of her futuristic works. Her approach is purely analytical, designing luminous landscapes using precise geometric lines. Created entirely in Adobe Illustrator, she calls these “infographic drawings”, reflecting on how we collect information about the world around us. In her statement, Plakhova writes, “This mathematical style helps me to illustrate everything from biological cell to the space and meditative worlds. That’s why I admire math, because it’s everywhere and nowhere.” Aside from math, she has credited music as her greatest inspiration. Her ambient new series titled “Light Beyond Sound” combines the design of her landscapes with that of sound. The series portrays interconnected entities flowing in colorful and harmonious rhythms. Music and mathematics share a complex connection. For instance, there are mathematical principles, such as rhythmic structure and intervals of repetition, in sound. So that we might better visualize their connection, Plakhova has set her drawings to music on her Vimeo page. Check out more works from her “Light Beyond Sound” series below.

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