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Brendan Tang’s Latest Japanese Manga-Infused “Ormolu” Vases

Canada based artist Brendan Tang creates classical influenced vases infused with the kind of visual dynamism found in Japanese manga. First featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 6, Tang continues to develop his mecha-like "ormolu" which combine contemporary subjects with 18th century era ceramic art techniques. Over the years, his art objects have increased in size, as in his recent collaboration with artist Alex McLeod, and he has also branched out into digital drawings.

Canada based artist Brendan Tang creates classical influenced vases infused with the kind of visual dynamism found in Japanese manga. First featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 6, Tang continues to develop his mecha-like “ormolu” which combine contemporary subjects with 18th century era ceramic art techniques. Over the years, his art objects have increased in size, as in his recent collaboration with artist Alex McLeod, and he has also branched out into digital drawings. Tang shared the concept behind these works in an email to Hi-Fructoese: “We are the fish that are swimming through culture daily,” he says. Tang is an artist between cultures himself – he was born in Ireland of Trinidadian parents and is a naturalized citizen of Canada. Through his latest series of vessels, Tang exhibits his unique and combined perspective of modern culture and globalization.

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